Bill Gates 2020 summer book recommendations
Bill Gates 2020 summer book recommendations

Bill Gates 2020 summer book recommendations

Here are five books bill gates recommends reading in this summer . 

1.The Choice: Embrace the Possible  

— by Dr Edith Eva Eger 

KEY NOTES : 

  • “Our painful experiences aren’t a liability—they’re a gift. They give us perspective and meaning, an opportunity to find our unique purpose and our strength.”
  • “We don’t know where we’re going, we don’t know what’s going to happen, but no one can take away from you what you put in your own mind.”
  • “Time doesn’t heal. It’s what you do with the time. Healing is possible when we choose to take responsibility, when we choose to take risks, and finally, when we choose to release the wound, to let go of the past or the grief.”
  • “To forgive is to grieve—for what happened, for what didn’t happen—and to give up the need for a different past.”
  • “Here you are! In the sacred present. I can’t heal you—or anyone—but I can celebrate your choice to dismantle the prison in your mind, brick by brick. You can’t change what happened, you can’t change what you did or what was done to you. But you can choose how you live now. My precious, you can choose to be free.”
  • “It’s the first time I see that we have a choice: to pay attention to what we’ve lost or to pay attention to what we still have.”
  • “You can live to avenge the past, or you can live to enrich the present.”
  • “the willingness to take absolute responsibility for your life; the willingness to risk; the willingness to release yourself from judgment and reclaim your innocence, accepting and loving yourself for who you really are—human, imperfect, and whole.”

KEY NOTES :

  • “My life amounts to no more than one drop in a limitless ocean. Yet what is any ocean, but a multitude of drops?”
  • “A half-read book is a half-finished love affair.”
  • “Our lives are not our own. We are bound to others, past and present, and by each crime and every kindness, we birth our future.”
  • “Travel far enough, you meet yourself.”
  • “Books don’t offer real escape, but they can stop a mind scratching itself raw.”
  • “Power, time, gravity, love. The forces that really kick ass are all invisible.”
  • “I believe death is only a door. One closes, and another opens. If I were to imagine heaven, I would imagine a door opening. And he would be waiting for me there.”
  • “If losers can exploit what their adversaries teach them, yes, losers can become winners in the long term.”

KEY NOTES :

  • “Optimism. One of the most important qualities of a good leader is optimism, a pragmatic enthusiasm for what can be achieved. Even in the face of difficult choices and less than ideal outcomes, an optimistic leader does not yield to pessimism. Simply put, people are not motivated or energized by pessimists.”
  • “True authority and true leadership come from knowing who you are and not pretending to be anything else.”
  • “Ask the questions you need to ask, admit without apology what you don’t understand, and do the work to learn what you need to learn as quickly as you can.”
  • “And I tend to approach bad news as a problem that can be worked through and solved, something I have control over rather than something happening to me.”
  • “At its essence, good leadership isn’t about being indispensable; it’s about helping others be prepared to possibly step into your shoes—giving them access to your own decision making, identifying the skills they need to develop and helping them improve, and, as I’ve had to do, sometimes being honest with them about why they’re not ready for the next step up.”
  • “If leaders don’t articulate their priorities clearly, then the people around them don’t know what their own priorities should be. Time and energy and capital get wasted.”
  • “If you approach and engage people with respect and empathy, the seemingly impossible can become real.”
  • “When hiring, try to surround yourself with people who are good in addition to being good at what they do. Genuine decency—an instinct for fairness and openness and mutual respect—is a rarer commodity in business than it should be, and you should look for it in the people you hire and nurture it in the people who work for you.”
  • “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood.”
  • “Don’t be in the business of playing it safe. Be in the business of creating possibilities of greatness”
  • “Don’t start negatively, and don’t start small. People will often focus on little details as a way of masking a lack of any clear, coherent, big thoughts. If you start petty, you seem petty.”
  • “You have to hear out other people’s problems and help find solutions. It’s all part of being a great manager.”

BOOK SUMMARY :

An epic history of the deadliest plague in human history – the great flu epidemic of 1918, which killed seven times as many people as died in the First World War.

 

No disease the world has ever known even remotely resembles the great influenza epidemic of 1918. Presumed to have begun when sick farm animals infected soldiers in Kansas, spreading and mutating into a lethal strain as troops carried it to Europe, it exploded across the world with unequaled ferocity and speed. It killed more people in twenty weeks than AIDS has killed in twenty years; it killed more people in a year than the plagues of the Middle Ages killed in a century. Victims bled from the ears and nose, turned blue from lack of oxygen, suffered aches that felt like bones being broken, and died. In the United States, where bodies were stacked without coffins on trucks, nearly seven times as many people died of influenza as in the First World War.

In his powerful new book, award-winning historian John M. Barry unfolds a tale that is magisterial in its breadth and in the depth of its research, and spellbinding as he weaves multiple narrative strands together. In this first great collision between science and epidemic disease, even as society approached collapse, a handful of heroic researchers stepped forward, risking their lives to confront this strange disease. Titans like William Welch at the newly formed Johns Hopkins Medical School and colleagues at Rockefeller University and others from around the country revolutionized American science and public health, and their work in this crisis led to crucial discoveries that we are still using and learning from today.

The Washington Post’s Jonathan Yardley said Barry’s last book can “change the way we think.” The Great Influenza may also change the way we see the world.

BOOK SUMMARY :

Banerjee and Duflo draw from recent developments in economics research to argue solutions to the issues facing modern economies and societies around the world, including slowing economic growth, immigration, income inequality, climate change, globalization and technological unemployment. The book argues against the idea that immigrants lower wages and take jobs from native workers. They also argue that people in poverty often make more sound financial decisions than is normally attributed to them.

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